PhD Course: International Political Sociology Seminar Series

Description

The series is made up of student-led monthly seminars jointly organised by the School of Politics and International Relations at Queen Mary and the Department of War Studies at King’s College London. It seeks to introduce PhD students from various disciplines to the ongoing research on International Political Sociology (IPS). It is aimed at both PhD students and faculty in international relations, human geography, political science, political economy, history, sociology, public policy, social policy, humanities, law, anthropology and other relevant disciplines, whose research uses concepts, tools and methods from the growing literature on IPS and cognate fields.

The series gives its participants the chance to present their work-in-progress to PhD colleagues and senior academics who work within the realm of IPS. In addition, it gives them an overview of the contemporary research in the field, as they attend 20 presentations by participants from various disciplines and institutions. Last but not least, it gives participants an opportunity to network with academics and students in their field of interest, opening doors for further intellectual discussions and research collaborations. The goal is to build interdisciplinary and cross-institutional links between PhD students and faculty.

Programme

The series will run over a period of 10 months. The exact time will be determined based on the preferences of the accepted participants. See below for the detailed programme, which is updated regularly.

In each seminar, two of the participants will present a piece of work-in-progress (dissertation chapter, book chapter, or journal paper) to the group, in the attendance of senior academics working within their field. Two of these academics will be discussants – one for each paper.

A week before each seminar, the papers will be circulated. Each presenter will then have 10 minutes to present their paper. Each presentation will be followed by the discussant’s intervention. Finally, the floor will be open to all attendees to put forth their questions and comments.

Presenters will be encouraged to invite supervisors and/or colleagues interested in their work to their presentation. All other participants are also welcome to invite attendees.

Snacks and tea/coffee will be provided.

Sponsor

The course is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council’s London Interdisciplinary Social Science Doctoral Training Partnership.

Lead organisers

Hesham Shafick, Teaching Associate & PhD Candidate, School of Politics and International Relations, Queen Mary University of London

Alvina Hoffmann, PhD Candidate, Department of War Studies, King’s College London

Organising committee

Jef Huysmans, Professor of International Politics, School of Politics and International Relations, Queen Mary University of London

Claudia Aradau, Professor of International Politics, Department of War Studies, King’s College London

Didier Bigo, Professor of International Relations, Department of War Studies, King’s College London

Elspeth Guild, Professor of Law, School of Law, Queen Mary University of London

Engin Isin, Professor in International Politics, School of Politics and International Relations, Queen Mary University of London

Vivienne Jabri, Professor of International Relations, Department of War Studies, King’s College London

 

Detailed programme

Date Presenters and titles Discussant
18 May 2018 Ida Danewid (LSE):

‘The Fire This Time: Grenfell, Racial Capitalism, and the Urbanisation of Empire’

Alvina Hoffmann (KCL):

‘Can rights claims subvert geopolitical regimes? Examples from the annexation of Crimea’

Time and location: 3-5pm at King’s College London in the War Studies Meeting Room, K6.07, Strand Campus

Rahul Rao

 

Jason Dittmer

22 June 2018 Hesham Shafick (QMUL):

‘The ‘ignorance contract’: Tahrir activists’ epistemic circuit and their collective (mis)recognition of Rab’aa massacre‘

Paul Kaletsch (SOAS):

‘Reconceptualizing the aftermath of social movements’

Time and location: 3-5pm at Queen Mary University of London, Room 2.17, Arts Two Building

Claudia Aradau

 

Tara Povey

3 July 2018 Pedro Rubio (Moscow/QMUL):

‘Invisible violence in the neoliberal order of international financial and political institutions’

Kiran Phull (LSE):
‘Development of a public opinion industry in the Arab region’

Time and location: 3-5pm at King’s College London in the River Room, 2nd floor, Strand Campus

Kim Hutchings

 

Javier Sajuria

21 September 2018 Hannah Goozee (KCL):

‘South Africa and Sierra Leone: The Trauma of Conflict and Peace’

Daniel Edler Duarte (KCL):

‘Assembling predictive policing technologies in Rio de Janeiro’

Time and location: 3-5pm at Queen Mary University of London

Clive Gabay

 

Brian Balmer

 

 

19 October 2018 Kerry Goettlich (LSE):

‘Enclosure and Survey Rationality in the Colonial Origins of Modern Territoriality’

Andonea Dickson (QMUL):

‘Militarising Borders: Evolving Systems of Power and Exclusion in Maritime Border’

Time and location: 3-5pm at King’s College London

Ayse Zarakol

 

 

Martina Tazzioli

29 November 2018 Adrian Rogstad (LSE):

‘Stigmatisation and counter-stigmatisation in international relations: Russian-Western relations, 2000-16’

Umut Adısönmez (University of Kent):

‘Unlikely Twins of the Middle East: Understanding the Intertwined Relationship between Turkey and Israel’s Intractable Conflicts and Conflict Transformation Failures’

Time and location: 3-5pm at Queen Mary University of London

Debbie Lisle

 

 

Ali Bilgic

14 December 2018 Bohdana Kurylo (SSEES/UCL):

Securitisation, the Audience and Civil Society: From Resistance to Empowerment

Marcus Curran (University of Portsmouth):

‘A Foucauldian genealogical approach to contemporary political discourse on drone warfare’

Time and location: 3-5pm at King’s College London

January 2019 Haya Al-Noaimi (SOAS):

‘Fractured Masculinities: Constructing Gendered Identities in Qatar and the UAE Between Protection and (in)security’

Alessandro Tirapani (City, Cass Business School):

‘Demystifying internships – the reproduction of precariousness among interns in Brussels’

February 2019 Kat Higgins (LSE):

Policing and the Australian security imaginary: interrogating the legitimacy of security action from the perspective of the mediated security ‘subject’’

Katharine T. Weatherhead (QMUL):

‘Unravelling Mediterranean Migration: Legal and political knowledge creation and diffusion among asylum seekers, refugees and migrants’

March 2019 Marc Winrow (LSE):

‘Rhetoric, foreign policy and sovereignty: explaining changes in state identity through the emergence of the Republic of Turkey from the Ottoman Empire’

Laura Jung (Sussex):

‘Embodied Sovereignty – Caring for the Body, Crafting the State’

April 2019 Matthew Gordon (SOAS):

‘Somaliland’s self-determination struggle’

Samuel Singler (University of Oxford):

‘Development and practice of contemporary European border controls’

 

 

May 2019 Madeleine Lindh (QMUL):

‘The concept of return in Politics and IR’

Negah Angha (KCL):

‘Resolving Conflict – the Sufi Way’

 

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